Death By Denial

I recently moved to a rural area from a heavily populated city because to me that city had become one huge, ugly, senseless never-ending parking lot. Sometimes the cars were moving and sometimes not. Regardless, they seemed to cover nearly all surfaces. No matter where I looked there were cars, concrete and asphalt. Beauty has a mighty struggle to find a space for roots between all that endless metal and concrete.

The ability to go into Denial – not to see, hear or feel something — can come in handy (and can sometimes save your life). It can also save us from having to make tough, inopportune and courageous decisions. It can lull us into apathy. In our consumer culture, we have sacrificed beauty for convenience.

Beauty is essential to health and an indication of higher intelligence. The beauty of Nature is vital to a healthy life. Beauty is the foundation of mental health: and the ethereal sustenance of physical health. It frees the Spirit to soar. It may sound like an immense exaggeration to some, but without a connection to Beauty, we entomb ourselves; we become the walking dead.

Denial is convenient, but not life-giving. Denial of the fact that we have eliminated the subtle essence of beauty in favor of consumerism is dangerous. We get used to things as they are and then we forget that this may not be the only or best way. We become immune to the negativities. We blind, deafen and numb ourselves. And then we become ill. But that too becomes just another one of those everyday ‘things.’ In Albert Camus’ novel “The Stranger,” Meursault is sentenced to death by decapitation. The story ends with Meursault in his cell, waiting for his death thinking, “After awhile you could get used to anything.”